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definition of law

The Law is the set of laws, resolutions, regulations created by a State, which may have a permanent and mandatory character according to the need of each one and which are strictly complied with by ALL the people who live in that community to guarantee good social coexistence between them and that the resolution of interpersonal conflicts come to fruition.

In other words, regardless of whether I consider that, for example, respecting a traffic rule is unfair, I must respect it and observe it because the law is not interested in private thoughts, but rather in guaranteeing the proper functioning of a society. In this way, it is admitted that the existence of law is relevant to allow the rights of citizens as individual beings to be articulated in an appropriate way to achieve the permanence of society as a whole.

Although sometimes we do not realize due to the daily routine and the automaticity of some situations or actions that we carry out every day of our lives, the law is one of the most present issues in each of our days; the fact of taking a means of transport every morning to go to work or the same work that we do in order to receive a generally monthly payment of money, are in their entirety things that imply a constituted right that we have. Faced with their lack, we can and have the right (worth the redundancy ...) to claim them if they are not fulfilled effectively and in a timely manner. That is, my boss has the obligation to pay me a stipulated amount of money at the end of the month and the transport company has the commitment to take me to that destination every day and I, to claim it in case that for any reason I do not do it. . Therefore, only when the right is fulfilled is the harmonious functioning of a society possible, since the lack of compliance with the law precipitates true situations of anarchy where some of the members will be harmed in their integrity, their patrimony or even with the loss of your life.

What gives us the right to all without exceptions, is the possibility of being equal before the law, that is, it does not matter for the law that my boss has more money or power than I do when making a claim for that money that was not paid to me. If so, the law will be on my side, of course. This equality before the law means that the constitutional rights or those granted by other laws or regulations are valid for all the inhabitants of a nation, regardless of their task, economic position or intellectual or academic training.

The law is nurtured and is generally based on written texts in which certain ideas or essential foundations were embodied to make use of the right, these are: the constitution, the law, the jurisprudence, the custom, the legal act, the treaties, the doctrine, among others. The systematization of these norms in different hierarchies allows their better ordering and avoids both contradictions and overlaps. Thus, a law issued by Parliament and promulgated by the executive branch cannot violate what is established in a higher level regulation, such as the Constitution. That is why agencies are required to monitor compliance with the law; In each nation, this body receives different names and is part of the Judiciary.

In addition, in federal countries, the law has, in addition to its national dimension, its own state or provincial organization that may differ in different nuances for each region. It is preferred that certain crimes or violations of rights of strategic importance remain in the hands of federal law, such as drug trafficking or national security, among others.

In addition, the law has been divided into various branches or categories to organize its treatment, such as administrative, civil, economic, political, procedural law, among the most important. Likewise, the proper performance of the law entails collaboration with other disciplines, such as health sciences (in the forensic field), exact sciences (in the performance of different kinds of expertise) and criminology (in its most varied approaches described by modern sciences).