Social

definition of segregation

The term segregation refers to one of the most traditional and persistent social problems of Humanity and that consists of the separation or marginalization that someone, a group, carries out against another or others as a consequence of race, culture, ideology or the gender they hold.

Separation or marginalization that is made against someone because of their racial origin, age, sex, ideology, among others

Segregation is the act of separating and generating divisions within the social groups that make up a community. It is based on the concept that individuals are different in a pejorative sense, which is why some (considered superior) do not want to maintain contact with those they consider inferior. Segregation can occur in a society with respect to foreigners who inhabit the same space as natives.

However, in some cases segregation can also occur between different social groups within the same community, for example with humble people.

Throughout the history of Humanity, man has always presented a tendency to generate the idea of ​​social, political, economic or cultural hierarchies that derive in some more or less rooted form of segregation. In addition, other factors such as fear or insecurity are also essential to encourage one part of society to segregate another even though these factors are unfounded.

Clear manifestation of violence

It is clear that segregation is a form of violence that costs a lot of work to reverse because it does not have to do directly with physical violence (although it can imply it) but rather it has to do mainly with attitudes of contempt towards those seen as inferior.

Racial, ethnic, cultural or social segregation always supposes a separation and in some cases it can even involve confinement in closed spaces or in very small environments to a large number of the population.

Today, segregation is seen as a direct damage to the life of the human being, which is why it is contemplated that when an act of segregation occurs, Human Rights are being violated.

However, in practice, despite the fact that Western societies have made great progress on this problem, the complexity of current multicultural societies and some Eastern cultures means that this issue is not completely disappeared and that cases of violence continue to be seen. extreme segregation, which with so much advancement of humanity are certainly untimely.

Segregation today: the case of Pakistani student Malala Yousafzai

For example, we cannot ignore the case of Arab cultures that today continue to consider women at a lower level than men and for example not only force them to cover themselves from head to toe but also prohibit them from performing. of activities and tasks so common for Western women such as studying and working because the societies in which they are built are so macho that they consider the same practices as purely masculine.

Obviously, women who dare to defy these prohibitions can suffer tremendous and violent punishments.

One of the most remembered cases in recent years for how bloody and cruel it turned out was the attack suffered by the young Pakistani Malala Yousafzai, who was attacked by the Taliban regime when she attended school because it had prohibited women from attending school. classes and Malala was a staunch defender of her rights.

He had developed a blog in which he wrote under a pseudonym and in it he counted the harassments to which Pakistani women were subjected.

She was 15 years old when in 2012 she was shot several times in her body and seriously injured. The motivation for this attack was obviously that social activism that he had undertaken years ago in favor of the education of women.

His recovery was long and took place in England, a country where he settled with his family since the Taliban regime swore death to his family.

Today, at the age of 19, Malala is a world leader in peace and in the fight against female segregation. She has been awarded various prizes, including the Nobel Peace Prize, one of the most relevant in the world, received in 2014 when she was 17 years old, and with this she set the record of being the youngest person to receive it in as regards the history of the award.